Archives du mot-clé Windows 8

Microsoft TechDays 2014: Après Coding4Fun, voici NUI4Fun !

NUI4FUN LogoLe KinectGeniusBar était présent aux Microsoft TechDays 2014 et présentait la session : Après Coding4Fun, voici NUI4Fun !

Au programme de cette session décalée:

  • NUI: Principes et objectifs
  • Les nouveautés de Kinect v2 et son SDK
  • Les capteurs dans Windows Phone 8 et Windows 8
  • Les possibilités de Gadgeteer
  • Une démo interactive NUI4FUN avec le jeu Missile Command revisité pour être multijoueurs et multimodales:
    • une chaise connectée Gadgeteer pour lancer les missiles quand on s’assoit
    • une tablette Windows8 pour déplacer les rampes de lancement
    • un WindowsPhone8 pour orienter les missiles
    • des gestes Kinect pour protéger la ville (main fermée pour faire exploser les missiles, deux doigts pour les repousser)
  • Conclusion: la pertinence des NUI

Lire la suite

Inside the Kinect for Windows SDK Update with Peter Zatloukal and Bob Heddle

Now that the updated Kinect for Windows SDK  is available for download, Engineering Manager Peter Zatloukal and Group Program Manager Bob Heddle sat down to discuss what this significant update means to developers.

Bob Heddle demonstrates the new infrared functionality in the Kinect for Windows SDK 
Bob Heddle demonstrates the new infrared functionality in the Kinect for Windows SDK.

Why should developers care about this update to the Kinect for Windows Software Development Kit (SDK)?

Bob: Because they can do more stuff and then deploy that stuff on multiple operating systems!

Peter: In general, developers will like the Kinect for Windows SDK because it gives them what I believe is the best tool out there for building applications with gesture and voice.

In the SDK update, you can do more things than you could before, there’s more documentation, plus there’s a specific sample called Basic Interactions that’s a follow-on to our Human Interface Guidelines (HIG). Human Interface Guidelines are a big investment of ours, and will continue to be. First we gave businesses and developers the HIG in May, and now we have this first sample, demonstrating an implementation of the HIG. With it, the Physical Interaction Zone (PhIZ) is exposed. The PhIZ is a component that maps a motion range to the screen size, allowing users to comfortably control the cursor on the screen.

This sample is a bit hidden in the toolkit browser, but everyone should check it out. It embodies best practices that we described in the HIG and is can be re-purposed by developers easily and quickly.

Bob: First we had the HIG, now we have this first sample. And it’s only going to get better. There will be more to come in the future.

Why upgrade?

Bob: There’s no downside to upgrading, so everyone should do it today! There are no breaking changes; it’s fully compatible with previous releases of the SDK, it gives you better operating support reach, there are a lot of new features, and it supports distribution in more countries with localized setup and license agreements. And, of course, China is now part of the equation.

Peter: There are four basic reasons to use the Kinect for Windows SDK and to upgrade to the most recent version:

  • More sensor data are exposed in this release.
  • It’s easier to use than ever (more samples, more documentation).
  • There’s more operating system and tool support (including Windows 8, virtual machine support, Microsoft Visual Studio 2012, and Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5).
  • It supports distribution in more geographical locations. 

What are your top three favorite features in the latest release of the SDK and why?

Peter: If I must limit myself to three, then I’d say the HIG sample (Basic Interactions) is probably my favorite new thing. Secondly, there’s so much more documentation for developers. And last but not least…infrared! I’ve been dying for infrared since the beginning. What do you expect? I’m a developer. Now I can see in the dark!

Bob: My three would be extended-range depth data, color camera settings, and Windows 8 support. Why wouldn’t you want to have the ability to develop for Windows 8? And by giving access to the depth data, we’re giving developers the ability to see beyond 4 meters. Sure, the data out at that range isn’t always pretty, but we’ve taken the guardrails off—we’re letting you go off-roading. Go for it!

New extended-range depth data now provides details beyond 4 meters. These images show the difference between depth data gathered from previous SDKs (left) versus the updated SDK (right). 
New extended-range depth data now provides details beyond 4 meters. These images show the difference between depth data gathered from previous SDKs (left) versus the updated SDK (right).

Peter: Oh yeah, and regarding camera settings, in case it isn’t obvious: this is for those people who want to tune their apps specifically to known environments.

What’s it like working together?

Peter: Bob is one of the most technically capable program managers (PMs) I have had the privilege of working with.

Bob: We have worked together for so long—over a decade and in three different companies—so there is a natural trust in each other and our abilities. When you are lucky to have that, you don’t have to spend energy and time figuring out how to work together. Instead, you can focus on getting things done. This leaves us more time to really think about the customer rather than the division of labor.

Peter: My team is organized by the areas of technical affinity. I have developers focused on:

  • SDK runtime
  • Computer vision/machine learning
  • Drivers and low-level subsystems
  • Audio
  • Samples and tools

Bob: We have a unique approach to the way we organize our teams: I take a very scenario-driven approach, while Peter takes a technically focused approach. My team is organized into PMs who look holistically across what end users need, versus what commercial customers need, versus what developers need.

Peter: We organize this way intentionally and we believe it’s a best practice that allows us to iterate quickly and successfully!

What was the process you and your teams went through to determine what this SDK release would include, and who is this SDK for?

Bob: This SDK is for every Kinect for Windows developer and anyone who wants to develop with voice and gesture. Seriously, if you’re already using a previous version, there is really no reason not to upgrade. You might have noticed that we gave developers a first version of the SDK in February, then a significant update in May, and now this release. We have designed Kinect for Windows around rapid updates to the SDK; as we roll out new functionality, we test our backwards compatibility very thoroughly, and we ensure no breaking changes.

We are wholeheartedly dedicated to Kinect for Windows. And we’re invested in continuing to release updated iterations of the SDK rapidly for our business and developer customers. I hope the community recognizes that we’re making the SDK easier and easier to use over time and are really listening to their feedback.

Peter Zatloukal, Engineering Manager
Bob Heddle, Group Program Manager
Kinect for Windows

Related Links

Kinect for Windows releases SDK update and launches in China

I’m very pleased to announce that the latest Kinect for Windows runtime and software development kit (SDK) have been released today. I am also thrilled to announce that the Kinect for Windows sensor is now available in China.

Developers and business leaders around the world are just beginning to realize what’s possible when the natural user interface capabilities of Kinect are made available for commercial use in Windows environments. I look forward to seeing the innovative things Chinese companies do with this voice and gesture technology, as well as the business and societal problems they are able to solve with it.

Kinect for Windows availability: current and coming soon

 

The updated SDK gives developers more powerful sensor data tools and better ease of use, while offering businesses the ability to deploy in more places. The updated SDK includes:

Extended sensor data access

  • Data from the sensor’s 3-axis accelerometer is now exposed in the API. This enables detection of the sensor’s orientation.
  • Extended-range depth data now provides details beyond 4 meters. Extended-range depth data is data beyond the tested and certified ranges and is therefore lower accuracy. For those developers who want access to this data, it’s now available.
  • Color camera settings, such as brightness and exposure, can now be set explicitly by the application, allowing developers to tune a Kinect for Windows sensor’s environment.
  • The infrared stream is now exposed in the API. This means developers can use the infrared stream in many scenarios, such as calibrating other color cameras to the depth sensor or capturing grayscale images in low-light situations.
  • The updated SDK used with the Kinect for Windows sensors allows for faster toggling of IR to support multiple overlapping sensors.

Access to all this data means new experiences are possible: Whole new scenarios open up, such as monitoring manufacturing processes with extended-range depth data. Building solutions that work in low-light settings becomes a reality with IR stream exposure, such as in theaters and light-controlled museums. And developers can tailor applications to work in different environments with the numerous color camera settings, which enhance an application’s ability to work perfectly for end users.

One of the new samples released demonstrates a best-in-class UI based on the Kinect for Windows

One of the new samples released demonstrates a best-in-class UI based on the Kinect for Windows
Human Interface Guidelines called the Basic Interactions – WPF sample.

Improved developer tools

  • Kinect Studio has been updated to support all new sensor data features.
  • The SDK ships with a German speech recognition language pack that has been optimized for the sensor’s microphone array.
  • Skeletal tracking is now supported on multiple sensors within a single application.
  • New samples show how to use all the new SDK features. Additionally, a fantastic new sample has been released that demonstrates a best-in-class UI based on the Kinect for Windows Human Interface Guidelines called the Basic Interactions – WPF sample.

We are committed to continuing to make it easier and easier for developers to create amazing applications. That’s why we continue to invest in tools and resources like these. We want to do the heavy lifting behind the scenes so the technologists using our platform can focus on making their specific solutions great. For instance, people have been using our Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) to design more natural, intuitive interactions since we released last May. Now, the Basic Interactions sample brings to life the best practices that we described in the HIG and can be easily repurposed.

Greater support for operating systems

  • Windows 8 compatibility. By using the updated Kinect for Windows SDK, you can develop a Kinect for Windows solution for Windows 8 desktop applications.
  • The latest SDK supports development with Visual Studio 2012 and the new Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5.
  • The Kinect for Windows sensor now works on Windows running in a virtual machine (VM) and has been tested with the following VM environments: Microsoft Hyper-V, VMWare, and Parallels. 

Windows 8 compatibility and VM support now mean Kinect for Windows can be in more places, on more devices. We want our business customers to be able to build and deploy their solutions where they want, using the latest tools, operating systems, and programming languages available today.

This updated version of the SDK is fully compatible with previous commercial versions, so we recommend that all developers upgrade their applications to get access to the latest improvements and to ensure that Windows 8 deployments have a fully tested and supported experience.

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, over the next few months we will be making Kinect for Windows sensors available in seven more markets: Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Poland, and Puerto Rico. Stay tuned; we’ll bring you more updates on interesting applications and deployments in these and other markets as we learn about them in coming months.

Craig Eisler
General Manager, Kinect for Windows

Key Links

Kinect for Windows at Imagine Cup 2012 Finals

The Imagine Cup competition—which recently concluded its tenth year—throws the spotlight on cutting-edge innovations. Two-thirds of the education-focused projects utilized Microsoft Kinect in a variety of different ways, including interactive therapy for stroke victims, an automated cart to help make solo trips to crowded public places manageable for the disabled, and an application to help dyslexic children learn the alphabet.

Team Wi-GO of Portugal invented a Kinect-enabled cart to aid the disabled.

Team Wi-GO of Portugal invented a Kinect-enabled cart to aid the disabled.

Students from 75 countries participated in the Imagine Cup Finals, held July 6 to 11 in Sydney, Australia, which featured more than 100 projects. Kinect for Windows played a significant role in this year's competition, with 28 Kinect-enabled projects across multiple categories—including Software Design, Game Design, Windows Azure, and a Fun Labs Challenge that was focused entirely on Kinect.

With the goal of using technology to help solve the world’s toughest problems, students put Kinect to work providing the digital eyes, ears, and tracking capabilities needed for a range of potential new products and applications. We applaud all of the teams who incorporated Kinect for Windows into their projects this year! Here are highlights from a few of them:

  • Third-place Software Design Category: Team wi-GO (Portugal) designed a cart to free the hands of a person in a wheelchair. It tracks the person seated in the chair while avoiding obstacles (including other people) when navigating through crowded stores, malls, airports, hospitals, and more. The solution may even have industrial applications, serving as a tool to transport objects without the need for human assistance.
    Tools: Kinect for Windows, Windows 8, and Netduino open-source electronics platform with .NET Micro Framework
  • Second-place Kinect Fun Labs Challenge: Team Whiteboard Pirates (United States) developed Duck Duck Punch, a "game" that provides therapy to people who have experienced strokes and need help improving their range-of-arm motion. This “game” has the patient stretch to hit digital birds within prescribed limits; physical therapists can tailor the experience to each individual’s needs.
    Tools: Kinect for Windows and Kinect Gadget Accelerator Kit
  • Third-place Kinect Fun Labs Challenge: Team Flexify (Poland) made Reh the Dragon, a rehabilitation application that transforms tedious rehabilitation exercises for children into a fun and engaging game-like adventure.
    Tools: Kinect for Windows and XNA Game Studio
  • Health Awareness Award: Italian Ingenium Team (Italy) developed The Fifth Element Project, which uses Kinect voice recognition and motion detection to help autistic children learn through play and movement.
    Tools: Kinect for Xbox 360, Windows Azure, Windows 7, and Windows 8
  • People’s Choice Award: The D Labs (India) built a tool for children who have dyslexia that aids in alphabet identification and other skills while tracking behavioral patterns.
    Tools: Kinect for Xbox 360, Microsoft Silverlight, Windows Azure, XNA Game Studio, and Windows 8
  • Finalist: Make a Sign (Belgium) created a sign language database, complete with Kinect motion tracking that confirms when a gesture is performed correctly.
    Tools: Kinect for Xbox 360, Windows Phone, and Windows Azure

« Imagine Cup is about giving students the resources and tools they need to succeed and then getting out of their way and letting them create, » said Walid Abu-Hadba, corporate vice president of Microsoft’s Developer and Platform Evangelism group. « Kinect in particular is unlocking a new class of interactive solutions. It’s inspiring to watch the way students from a multitude of backgrounds find common ground as they combine their love of technology with their determination to make a difference. It’s amazing. »

We look forward to next year’s Imagine Cup. In the meantime, keep up the great work.

Kinect for Windows Team

Key Links

• Kinect for Windows Gallery
• Imagine Cup website
• Imagine Cup winners and finalists
• Team wi-GO
• Team Whiteboard Pirates
• Team Flexify
• Italian Ingenium Team
• The D Labs
• Make a Sign